Hadong Mt. Jiri Green Tea, South Korea

We have been getting a "moderate to heavy" snowfall, which began yesterday and is due to continue today. Despite promises that it would be neither fluffy nor super wet, the first inches were decidedly heavy-wet. Not fun to shovel, yet so beautiful. Between shoveling stints, I reached again for the 2021 Korean Green Tea Luxury … Continue reading Hadong Mt. Jiri Green Tea, South Korea

Boseong Green Tea, South Korea

The Decline and Renewal of Tea in Korea When tea is part of a country's culture early on, it's interesting that it can fade from popularity. But such was the case in Korea, when Confucianism displaced Buddhism. Ramifications were culture-changing. The Choson Dynasty made a big push to eliminate Buddhist influence in all aspects of … Continue reading Boseong Green Tea, South Korea

Korean Green Tea

Receiving new tea—especially something you've never tried—is always exciting! Last month, my daughter and son-in-law surprised me with a gift set of green tea from Teas Unique of South Korea. Although tea has been grown in Korea for ages, I've had only South Korean tisanes (ginger, ginseng, citron, and barley), and one actual tea, the … Continue reading Korean Green Tea

How Does Decaf Tea Compare to the Real Thing?

"Decaffeinated" with "tea" is an ill-suited pair in my mind. Because no, I can't live without caffeine (my family will attest to this). Still, there are several flavored decaf black teas that I've found quite acceptable. But what about classic teas, those teas without flavor additives? Can those withstand the decaffeination process? Decaf tea itself is … Continue reading How Does Decaf Tea Compare to the Real Thing?

New to Tea? Start Here (Part 2: White and Green Tea)

Continuing my informal guide to selecting tea—having gone through the caffeine/no-caffeine decision and having looked at low- and no-caffeine options (see New to Tea? Start Here)—we're now looking at the types of tea that come from one plant, Camellia sinensis. And asking whether you want white, green oolong, black, or fermented? And do you want … Continue reading New to Tea? Start Here (Part 2: White and Green Tea)

New to Tea? Start Here

Step into any tea store, in person or online, and the choices are staggering. If you're new to loose tea, the range of options can even be paralyzing. Where do you possibly begin? Added to the confusion is that although tea leaves (Camellia sinensis) are rightfully called "tea," other leaves, flowers, and even spice blends … Continue reading New to Tea? Start Here

My Moroccan Teapot: Graceful and Functional, but Is It Safe?

As probably all of us have been discovering, staying at home brings some unforeseen minor inconveniences. We dismiss them as petty, especially in light of those who are currently working so hard to ensure we still have groceries and garbage pickup and emergency furnace repair and health care despite an overburdened system. But for those … Continue reading My Moroccan Teapot: Graceful and Functional, but Is It Safe?

Making Houjicha with Tea Grower and Tea Master Takatomo Katagi

Mr. Takatomo Katagi comes from a long line of tea growers in Japan's Asamiya region of the Shiga Prefecture. The seventh-generation head of Katagi Kokaen tea garden, Mr. Katagi is building on his family's legacy. Some forty years ago, his father converted the garden to organic production. As Mr. Katagi explains, "Unlike vegetables, tea leaves … Continue reading Making Houjicha with Tea Grower and Tea Master Takatomo Katagi

Old Tree Bancha Tea Contains the WHOLE Tree!

Old Tree Bancha. Does that mean bancha made of leaves from ancient tea plants (good)? Or bancha that's been sitting around awhile (bad)? Actually, neither. I had never heard of this tea until Lisa of TeaHaus told me about it after touring Japan's tea gardens in Shiga Prefecture back in 2018, having been invited by … Continue reading Old Tree Bancha Tea Contains the WHOLE Tree!

Cranberries Add Balance to This Fruity Tea

Cranberries are fully entrenched in current thanks-giving traditions—and rightfully so because these bright red berries are native to our country and had long been eaten by Native Americans, including mixed into pemmican, a nutrient-rich food that stored and carried well. Our native cranberry is Vaccinium macrocarpon, which has a larger berry than the European variety. The … Continue reading Cranberries Add Balance to This Fruity Tea