Is Tea Helpful after Heart Attack or Stroke?

Research is exciting! It's also generally very slow. Although the incredibly fast development of the COVID-19 vaccination may lead us to believe that science moves quickly—and it certainly did in this case—the usual course is far more plodding. Take the studies into how and/or whether drinking tea produces tangible and measurable health benefits. This sort … Continue reading Is Tea Helpful after Heart Attack or Stroke?

How Does Decaf Tea Compare to the Real Thing?

"Decaffeinated" with "tea" is an ill-suited pair in my mind. Because no, I can't live without caffeine (my family will attest to this). Still, there are several flavored decaf black teas that I've found quite acceptable. But what about classic teas, those teas without flavor additives? Can those withstand the decaffeination process? Decaf tea itself is … Continue reading How Does Decaf Tea Compare to the Real Thing?

Do You Need a Green Teacup for Green Tea?

Do you have a favorite cup, and if so, what makes it your favorite? My dad has a favorite coffee cup based on its shape and how the lip curves in just the right way. My husband's favorite is simply the one that holds the most liquid! Back in the 700s, during China's Tang Dynasty … Continue reading Do You Need a Green Teacup for Green Tea?

New to Tea? Start Here (Part 2: White and Green Tea)

Continuing my informal guide to selecting tea—having gone through the caffeine/no-caffeine decision and having looked at low- and no-caffeine options (see New to Tea? Start Here)—we're now looking at the types of tea that come from one plant, Camellia sinensis. And asking whether you want white, green oolong, black, or fermented? And do you want … Continue reading New to Tea? Start Here (Part 2: White and Green Tea)

COVID-19 Research Includes Tea

Wouldn't it be nice if a cure or treatment for COVID-19 were something simple, something already sitting in our homes just waiting to be discovered? Something as simple as a cup of tea? Well, reality is rarely uncomplicated or easy, especially when it comes to fighting viruses that are tough, adaptive, and tenacious. So if … Continue reading COVID-19 Research Includes Tea

Amid the COVID-19 Pandemic, a Look at Tea and Stress

With coronavirus COVID-19 a global pandemic, medical and science personnel worldwide are in the forefront as we all await news about treatment, cure, vaccine, anything promising. Many aspects of our lives are on hold as we worry about the health of those we love, and as we wonder how businesses will survive, how employees without … Continue reading Amid the COVID-19 Pandemic, a Look at Tea and Stress

Making Houjicha with Tea Grower and Tea Master Takatomo Katagi

Mr. Takatomo Katagi comes from a long line of tea growers in Japan's Asamiya region of the Shiga Prefecture. The seventh-generation head of Katagi Kokaen tea garden, Mr. Katagi is building on his family's legacy. Some forty years ago, his father converted the garden to organic production. As Mr. Katagi explains, "Unlike vegetables, tea leaves … Continue reading Making Houjicha with Tea Grower and Tea Master Takatomo Katagi

Drink Tea, Live Longer?

Do you ever tire of the constant headlines shouting out the newest and best health food, the latest claim? The "drink this" and you'll live better and longer? Right now, some people are jumping on a study published on January 8 in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology that probes possible links between drinking tea … Continue reading Drink Tea, Live Longer?

Cranberries Add Balance to This Fruity Tea

Cranberries are fully entrenched in current thanks-giving traditions—and rightfully so because these bright red berries are native to our country and had long been eaten by Native Americans, including mixed into pemmican, a nutrient-rich food that stored and carried well. Our native cranberry is Vaccinium macrocarpon, which has a larger berry than the European variety. The … Continue reading Cranberries Add Balance to This Fruity Tea

Nepali Teas Come into Their Own

Although few knew it at the time, a seismic shift took place when botanist Robert Fortune spirited high-quality tea plants out of China in the mid-1800s. Transplanting them into Himalayan soil, he opined that “a boon will have been conferred upon the people of India” if that country’s poor could be provided with an affordable tea, … Continue reading Nepali Teas Come into Their Own